Why There’s An ‘Airbnb’ for Just About Anything

Why There’s An ‘Airbnb’ for Just About Anything

Originally published: Yahoo Finance – The Fiscal Times – By Marine Cole July 8, 2014 6:00 PM The success of Airbnb and Uber has unveiled dozens of startups hoping to cash in on the sharing economy, a.k.a. collaborative consumption. There’s now an Airbnb (and an Uber) for almost everything, as new startups are simply copying Airbnb’s or Uber’s formula while focusing on different products. Airbnb, which allows people from all over the world to rent their homes to travelers, has been valued at about $10 billion, following a $475 million round of financing in April. Meanwhile, car-sharing company Uber was valued at about $17 billion last month. “The revolutionary power of Airbnb and Uber comes from their ability to harness technology to create a social sharing platform that facilitates trust by creating transparency and dual accountability,” wrote Barbara Gray, an analyst with Brady Capital Research, in a post last month. At the sight of such valuations, programmers and entrepreneurs from Silicon Alley to Silicon Valley have dollar signs in their eyes, hoping they, too, can take advantage of the trend. Here are a few examples based on the Airbnb model: Boatbound: for boats Nearbox: for storage Hipcamp: for campsites Spare Chair: for workspaces Airpnp: for toilets (you read that right) SPOT Park: for parking spots Suppershare: for kitchens and meals Here are few examples based on the Uber model: LawTrades: for lawyers Bannerman: for bodyguards Massage: for massages Canary: for cannabis delivery Minibar: for alcohol delivery Worthee:  for dog walking While not all of these startups will achieve multi-billion valuations, of course, many experts believe there’s plenty of room for several more social sharing sites. “I have no doubt...
Why Uber & Airbnb Sit Atop the ‘Social Economy Pyramid’

Why Uber & Airbnb Sit Atop the ‘Social Economy Pyramid’

Originally posted in bostinno.streetwise.co · by Nate Boroyan – City News Writer 06/22/14 @4:58pm in City News As of June 22, Barbara Gray, an equity analyst and founder of Brady Capital Research, has seen her article, “Social Capital: The Secret behind Airbnb and Uber,” tweeted over 1.2 thousand times; garner 2.1 thousand Facebook “Likes;” and shared another 8.4 thousand times on LinkedIn. Gray’s article breaks down the “Social Economy Pyramid” (scroll down) and analyzes three levels of companies that operate within it: Social Mission companies, Social Marketplace companies and Social Sharing companies. Gray queries: How is it that Airbnb and Uber have been able to build thriving ecosystems in just over five years with such significant scale and influence that they are now valued at $10 billion and $12 billion? And how have these companies become such a disruptive force that they are the target of deafening protests from the highly ensconced hotel and taxi industries in cities around the world? The answer, she says, is social capital. According to Gray, “the higher a company moves up the Social Economy Pyramid, the faster the rate of value acceleration as they are able to achieve a higher level of disruption and access multiple social value drivers.” And social sharing companies Uber and Airbnb, the quickest to reach the $10 billion valuation mark, sit atop the pyramid. Why? Because Uber and Airbnb, Gray explains, are able to “access three social value drivers: Advocacy, Connection, and Collaboration.” Continues Gray, “The revolutionary power of Airbnb and Uber comes from their ability to harness technology to create a social sharing platform that facilitates trust...
“GOOD INSIGHT INTO THE SOCIAL ECOSYSTEM”

“GOOD INSIGHT INTO THE SOCIAL ECOSYSTEM”

Originally Posted at Text Medic, May 25, 2014 “Customers, employees, and suppliers are empowered” through social media, said Barbara Gray, CFA, Equity Analyst and Founder of Brady Capital Research, (BCR) and this fosters the growth of firms that behave responsibly to them. Her company actively promotes investment in companies with “positive social capital.” Gray was the second panellist (of four) to address the topic “The Impact of Social Media on the Investment Process” at a CFA Toronto Society gathering held in the gallery of the TMX Broadcast Centre on the evening of May 21, 2014. As an example of negative social capital, she cited a case of Air Canada cancelling flights and then rebooking them more than a day later at highly inconvenient times—and not caring that it had created a dissatisfied client who would use it as an example of poor service in a public forum. By contrast, a bungled reservation throughAirBnB that required rebooking and a change of plans, became a positive experience due to fast response time on social media from persons high up in the corporation. “Good companies are using social tools to disrupt” established methods of customer interaction. “Most investors don’t realize this,” said Gray. Brady Capital Research closely follows six companies. “We monitor mention of these companies on Twitter, especially during the all-important earnings season.” Brady Capital Research uses the number of followers on LinkedIn, plus other variables, to assess a company’s social reach. “It gives good insight into the social ecosystem,” said Gray. Moderator Eric Lam posited there were risks to moving faster on social media, such as the recent scare, spread through a hacked Twitter account, that the White House...
Social capital: A new company metric

Social capital: A new company metric

Barbara Gray, CFA – May 6, 2013 Excerpt from the Financial Post Barry Critchley – For about two decades, Barbara Gray was a sell side analyst/associate who covered a variety of sectors including industrial products, consumer discretionary and consumer staples. For the past three years the founder of Brady Capital Research has been trying to create a different way of evaluating companies, a way that focuses on a new form of equity called social capital. In her previous career, Gray limited her analysis to financial capital. And in a recent paper, titled Why Companies With a Greater Purpose Will Thrive in the New Social Era, Brady, along with co-author Atlanta-based Bright House, predicted that social capital will “appreciate in value,” in part because of growth in the “density of connections within and between the different social networks.” It follows that positive social value will lead to a decrease in risk while negative social capital will lead to an increase in risk…...
Barbara Gray’s path from income trusts to the rise of social capital

Barbara Gray’s path from income trusts to the rise of social capital

The analyst sees an important new yardstick for investors JACQUELINE NELSON October 22, 2012 at 3:54 PM EDT Source: Globe and Mail After the great wave of Canadian income trusts broke in 2006, top-ranked analyst Barbara Gray began to shift her focus. Now she is back on the map with a new job, and a new investing philosophy she thinks could change the way market watchers view social media. After leaving Blackmont Capital Inc. in 2008, and then Odlum Brown Ltd. in 2010., Ms. Gray took some personal time off. She read dozens of business strategy books and wrote a report on social media as a “disruptive force” for companies. Almost a year ago she launched Brady Capital Research – an investment research firm built on the idea that the risk and growth profiles of companies can be seriously influenced by social media. She’s still working on that thesis, but has also recently joined Dixon Mitchell Investment Counsel Inc., a Vancouver-based firm where she’ll manage the enhanced dividend portfolio – a career move a little closer to her roots. Social capital has obviously become her passion, though, and Ms. Gray says it is quite unlike brand equity or goodwill. People don’t really use social media to talk about a business’s brand, but rather what the company actually stands for, and its actions. “The relationships companies have with their stakeholders and customers is more liquid than before the rise of social media, and consumers are better able to self-organize,” she said. This creates new assets, but also liabilities. She has three categories in which she places companies. All firms have...
Intellectual Asset Management: Social capital

Intellectual Asset Management: Social capital

By Barbara Gray, CFA – April 2, 2012 Source: IAM Magazine Excerpt: “Most investors are unaware that social media is ushering in a social capital revolution, and that this will change the underlying risk and growth profiles of companies Social media is leading to the creation of a new form of appreciating equity called social capital. This will accelerate the value creation/erosion process for companies. As a result, investors need to start looking beyond traditional quantitative analytical and valuation metrics. When they do, they will find that so-called ‘heart and soul’ stocks offer long-term strategic investors a good play on the appreciating value of social...